Top China Stocks Annual Performance 2013

Well, the year end is upon us, and we’ve heard how the Shanghai Composite Index has done over 2013. But what about the twenty major stocks which this website tracks? Let’s take a look. (All charts and data are from Google Finance).

Sinopec -27.11%

Sinopec 2013

PetroChina -13.95%

PetroChina 2013

ICBC -12.47%

ICBC 2013

China Construction Bank -8.63%

China Construction Bank 2013

Agricultural Bank of China -10.51%

Agricultural Bank 2013

Bank of China -9.03%

Bank of China 2013

China Mobile -11.08%

China Mobile 2013

Noble Group -8.94%

Noble Group 2013

China State Construction Engineering -18.23%

China State Constuction Engineering  2013

CNOOC -14.37%

CNOOC 2013

China Railway Construction -19.66%

China Railway Construction 2013

China Railway Group -12.17%

China Railway Group 2013

SAIC Motor -16.97%

SAIC Motor 2013

China Life Insurance -25.05%

China Life Insurance 2013

Dongfeng Motor +0.83%

Dongfeng Motor 2013

China Shenghua Energy -36.2%

China Shenhua Energy 2013

Ping An Insurance -5.22%

Ping An Insurance 2013

China Telecom -7.76%

China Telecom 2013

China Communications Construction -22.2%

China Communications Construction 2013

Bank of Communications -20.5%

Bank of Communications 2013

In a handy chart:

Name % Change
Dongfeng Motor +0.83%
Ping An Insurance -5.22%
China Telecom -7.76%
China Construction Bank -8.63%
Noble Group -8.94%
Bank of China -9.03%
Agricultural Bank -10.51%
China Mobile -11.08%
China Railway Group -12.17%
ICBC -12.47%
PetroChina -13.95%
CNOOC -14.37%
SAIC Motor -16.97%
China State Construction Engineering -18.23%
China Railway Construction -19.66%
Bank of Communications -20.5%
China Communications Construction -22.2%
China Life Insurance -25.05%
Sinopec -27.11%
China Shenhua Energy -36.2%

2013 has been very poor indeed for major Chinese stocks. No wonder SOEs have been warned that poor performance will be “severely dealt with“. (While all the companies listed are on the stock market, most still have substantial state ownership, and even more substantial state influence). But it’s equally clear that things have to change.

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